Competitors relaxing with  
their partners at the show.
Welcome!
Thank you for visiting Equestrian Event
Management.  My goal is to offer well-run
equestrian competitions and events that
provide both human and equine participants,
as well as staff, volunteers, and officials, a
safe, positive, and fun experience.

I believe that competition should be enjoyed,
and strive to provide a professionally run
event that allows the competitors and staff to
focus on the task at hand.  Customer service
is important to me, and I value your input.
Equestrian Event Management, LLC
Equestrian Event Management, LLC
WHAT MAKES A SUCCESSFUL HORSE SHOW?  VOLUNTEERS!!

A competent secretary and manager can organize a horse show and keep the paperwork
straight.  Licensed officials and support staff—EMT, vet, farrier, judges and TD—also
keep the show in good standing with USEF, and help make it a safe and worthwhile
competition. Even with those resources in place, you still don’t have a horse show.
Add a nice facility—still no horse show!
Add the competitors—STILL no horse show!!
Add the noble steeds—STILL no horse show!!!
What it takes to make a successful, safe, fun horse show is a crew of VOLUNTEERS!

Many competitors don’t realize that the final report on the show completed by the technical
delegate includes specific issues relating to volunteers: Were there enough?  Did they
get the training they needed to do their assigned jobs?  Did show management take care
of them adequately in terms of food, drink, and reasonable shift lengths?  If the answers
to those questions aren’t what the licensing organization needs to hear, then the license
itself is in jeopardy.

At EEM, I understand the importance of the volunteer to the success of the show. When
approached about managing any organization’s horse show or equestrian event, my first
question will be:  Will we have enough volunteers?  For a two-day, five-ring dressage
show, “enough” is in the neighborhood of 60 people—assuming most are willing to work
a full day in the hot sun, among nervous competitors, or in a sometimes tense show
office.

Realizing that volunteering is a labor of love, EEM enforces some basic rules regarding
volunteers. When someone volunteers for us, we promise them that:

A)        They will be well fed, and have plenty to drink throughout the day.
B)        They will get breaks!
C)        They will be trained for any job they are asked to do.
D)        They will have back-up if unforeseen problems arise during the day.
E)        They will have our expressed thanks, including a small gift at the end of the day.

Finally, it must be mentioned that a volunteer should NEVER bear the brunt of an unhappy
competitor’s unsportsmanlike behavior.  At all times, volunteers must be able to rely on
show management’s intervention (and the TD’s if necessary) should a competitor
become difficult.

If you are interested in volunteering, I would love to hear from you!  Email or call me—the
sooner the better!  

Shannon Pedlar
Bossung (703) 431-5663 sgp588@hotmail.com